Documents

70 views

Cub Scout Roundtable

Cub Scout Roundtable . February Roundtable Compassion Core Value for March. February 2014 Roundtable Compassion. Being kind and considerate and showing concern for the well-being of others. Cub Scouts will develop care and concern for the well-being of others
of 56
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Share
Transcript
Cub Scout Roundtable February RoundtableCompassionCore Value for MarchFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionBeing kind and considerate and showing concern for the well-being of others. Cub Scouts will develop care and concern for the well-being of others by learning about simple first-aid and preparation for emergencies.Through participating in Cub Scout activities, boys will learn different waysto solve problems using various methods and means“The most worthwhile thing is to try to put happiness into the lives of others.”Lord Baden PowellFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionA Smile is Quite a Funny ThingA smile is quite a funny thing.It wrinkles up your face,And when it's gone you never findIt's secret hiding place.But far more wonderful it isTo see what smiles can do,You smile at one, he smiles at youAnd soon one smile makes two. February 2014 RoundtableCompassionCub Scout Program Delivery MethodCub Scouting’s 12 Core ValuesCooperation Responsibility Citizenship Respect Positive Attitude Resourcefulness Compassion (Mar 2014)Faith Health and Fitness Perseverance Courage Honesty You ARE HEREDON’T EVER FORGET THAT ALL 12 SHOULD BE SHOWN AND TAUGHT AT EVERY MEETING - The Program HIGHLIGHTS one of the 12 but never forget to teach them all.February 2014 RoundtableCompassionCub Scout to Boy ScoutCub Scouting’s 12 Core ValuesCooperationResponsibility Citizenship Respect Positive Attitude Resourcefulness Compassion Faith Health and Fitness Perseverance Courage Honesty Boy Scouting’s Scout LawHelpful, Cheerful, FriendlyHelpful, TrustworthyHelpful Courteous, ObedientCheerfulThrifty Friendly, Kind ReverentClean Thrifty Brave Trustworthy, Loyal Excite the boys about their preparation for Boy Scouts - show them the connectionFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionCompassion:Being kind and considerate, and showing concern for the well-being of others.Everybody has something valuable to offer and nobody likes being left out. Help your Cub Scouts be aware of the needs of others. Disabled children deal with limitations in their everyday lives.Not all of your Cub Scouts may be able to participate with the same success. Understanding Cub Scouts with disabilities and adapting activities will provide excitement and adventure for all. Your responsibility as a leader is to help all Cub Scouts find success in doing their best.February 2014 RoundtableCompassionCompassion:Being kind and considerate, and showing concern for the well-being of others.Everybody has something valuable to offer and nobody likes being left out. Help your Cub Scouts be aware of the needs of others. Disabled children deal with limitations in their everyday lives.COMPASSION requires a person to be able to put action to their kindness and an ability to empathize.February 2014 RoundtableCompassion
  • Know- Tell why as a leader, it is important to show kindness and concern for other people. List ways leaders show they care about the thought and feelings of others.
  • Commit- Tell why a good leader must consider the ideas, abilities, and of others. Tell why it might be hard for a leader to protect another person’s well-being. Tell ways you can be kind and compassionate.
  • Practice- While you complete the requirements for this achievement, find ways to be kind and considerate of others.
  • CHARACTER CONNECTIONSThe Character Connection sections in the Handbooks are a great place to start asking “leading” questions. Boys tend to not want to fully say what they are thinking – these questions help you, the leader, get them involved and actively sharing.February 2014 RoundtableCompassionExplain:Talk about what it means have compassion. What are some ways Scouts can learn to show more compassion towards those around them?Demonstrate:Experience a disability in a game or sport. For instance by being blindfolded or having an arm rendered unusable, teach understanding when others have trouble with a game. Never tease. Show how winning is doing one's best.Guide:Take the den on a service activity that benefits groups with disabilities in the community, such as visiting a retirement home. Help the boys to be aware of ways to offer service to those in need.Enable:Have the boys brainstorm ideas for how they can provide a service to the community, choose one, and carry it out.Want to Learn more about EDGE? Come to Wood BadgeFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassion
  • Connecting Compassion with
  • Cub Scouting Activities
  • Hikes
  • Take turns carrying items for each other on a hike
  • Do an “inch hike” to make your scouts realize their impact to all around
  • Nature Activities
  • Make bird feeders and fill them
  • Collect blankets or supplies for animal shelter
  • Service Projects
  • Service to the elderly or disabled – activities like helping with trash, flower planting, sweeping, watering
  • Games and Sports
  • Play games with a disability – (i.e. blindfolding, tie an arm down) – show how winning is helping each other
  • February 2014 RoundtableCompassion
  • Connecting Compassion with
  • Cub Scouting Activities
  • Ceremonies
  • Hold a ceremony to recognize compassionate behavior – especially to peers
  • Campfires
  • Give skits showing compassionate behavior
  • Perhaps a skit that shows how laughing at mistakes is not the Scouting way
  • Den Trips
  • Visit shut-ins and elderly at times OTHER than holidays
  • Teach patience and compassion when waiting for others that are slower or need rest
  • Pack Overnighters
  • Have boys bring someone who needs a friend
  • Share belongings with other that have forgotten something
  • Teach kindness and caring during setup/cooking
  • February 2014 RoundtableResourcefulnessCub Scouts with Special needs4 Categories:
  • Learning (such as ADD)
  • Physical -hampers physical activities
  • Developmental-ability to learn
  • Emotional -affects one to adjust to stresses
  • InclusionIt is a philosophy - a belief that ALL persons have a right to belong! Inclusion just doesn’t happen on its own _ it happens when we commit to the philosophy and make efforts to support the inclusion of ALL people.It is a process - an ongoing practice; not a program or a product _ not a one-time event.WHY INCLUSION?It’s the LAW – we have a legal responsibility to NOT discriminate against youth with disabilities and children with disabilities are protected and guaranteed the same civil rights as every other child.It’s MORALLY and ETHICALLY the right thing to do.February 2014 RoundtableResourcefulness•Don’t label people with disabilities as a large group—“the disabled.” A better way to refer to such a large group is to say, “people with disabilities.”• Speak about the person first, then, if necessary, the person’s disability. A boy’s disability only needs to be mentioned if he needs special consideration or action to accommodate it.• Emphasize a person’s abilities, not disabilities (ex. If asked about Bobby’s, describe him as enthusiastic and smart; not as person with autism.)• Do not base your opinion of a person solely on their disability; get to know the whole person.• Always let a person with a disability speak for himself. If a boy is not able to speak for himself, the guadian will let you know that. If you want to know about the disability, ask him, not the person standing next to him! And if he doesn’t want to talk about his disability, honor his wish and don’t keep asking.• Remember A den of 6, in theory, will have 6 different "Do your Bests".Additional Reources can be found at NCAC website: Serving Scouts with DisabilitiesFebruary 2014 RoundtableResourcefulnessBARRIERS:•Negative attitudes and/or stereotypes•Fear•Lack of understanding of legal responsibility•Lack of training•Inadequate ratios of adults to children•Lack of support from leadership•Lack of a plan to implement and sustain inclusion practicesMYTHS ABOUT INCLUSION:•Every child with a disability needs a one-on-one aide.•You have to know everything about a child’s disability in order to support that child.•It costs too much to be inclusive.•Including childrenWhat to do:
  • Communicate with boy’s parents/guardians
  • Observe the Scouts
  • Accept each boy
  • Important etiquette to keep in mind when talking about and/or getting to know someone with a disability:February 2014 RoundtableResourcefulnessResourcesScouting for Youth With Disabilities Manual BSA #34059 Scouting With Special Needs and Disabilities Guide to Working with Scouts with Disabilities (BSA #33056) February 2014 RoundtableCompassionDisabilities Awareness Belt Loop
  • Visit with a friend, family member, classmate, or other person with disabilities. Find out what this person enjoys and what this person finds difficult.
  • Attend a disabilities event such as an Easter Seals event, Special Olympics, a performance with sign language interpretation, an activity with Guiding Eyes dogs, or a wheelchair race. Tell your adult leader what you thought about the experience.
  • Make a display about one or more disabilities. It can include physical, learning, or mental challenges. Share the display at a pack meeting.
  • February 2014 RoundtableCompassionDifferences Awareness Trail
  • Set up a variety of stations where boys can experience physical challenges
  • Wear eyeglasses smeared with petroleum jelly to simulate impaired vision
  • Place cotton in the ears or wear ear protectors to simulate impaired hearing
  • Tie magazines around the knees to simulate walking difficulties
  • Try using sign language alphabet to communicate – no talking
  • Give instructions to boys to do a task but add in words that do not make sense
  • Have two fingers wrapped together to simulate a broken finger – then attempt to tie shoe
  • Use opposite hand to try and write name
  • Wear work gloves and attempt to stack pennies
  • Use only one arm and work to tie shoes, button coat or zip jacket
  • February 2014 RoundtableCompassionScout Heroism AwardsRecognition is given to a member of the Boy Scouts of America—Cub Scout, Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, Venturer, or adult leader—where the evidence presented shows that he or she saved or attempted to save life under circumstances that indicate heroism and risk of his or her own life.
  • Honor Medal with Crossed Palms.
  • Has demonstrated unusual heroism and extraordinary skill or resourcefulness in saving or attempting to save a life at extreme risk to self.
  • Honor Medal.
  • Has demonstrated unusual heroism and skill or resourcefulness in saving or attempting to save a life at considerable risk to self.
  • February 2014 RoundtableCompassionFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionBeAScout.orgIf a new family moves into Charles County in your neighborhood with young boys, which Cub Scout Pack will they choose? Will it be yours? or the Pack down the street? How would a new family know your Cub Scout Pack even exists? The answer is the BeAScout.org web site. Families looking for a Scout unit simply go to the web site and enter their ZIP code. A map of the area will be shown with all the Cub Scout Packs highlighted. It is then possible to drill down to the neighborhood level and find the nearest Pack. However, if your Pack information hasn’t been updated in BeAScout.org, their enquiry will be routed to the Council office. If the information on the Cub Scout map mark has been updated, a visitor will receive the location and contact information for your Pack. Make sure your Pack is in position to take advantage of this free advertising. Don’t lose potential members because you haven’t updated your BeAScout site. February 2014 RoundtableCompassionFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionScout Heroism Awards
  • Heroism Award.
  • Has demonstrated heroism and skill in averting serious injury or saving or attempting to save a life at minimum risk to self.
  • Medal of Merit.
  • Has performed an act of service of a rare or exceptional character that reflects an uncommon degree of concern for the well-being of others.
  • February 2014 RoundtableCompassionScout Heroism AwardsHeroism: conduct exhibiting courage and daring, skill, and self-sacrifice.
  • Award Name Created 2011 Cumulative
  • Honor Medal With 1938 13 263
  • Crossed Palms
  • Honor Medal 1923 31 2,302
  • Heroism Award 1923 121 3,351
  • Medal of Merit 1946 101 6,103
  • 0February 2014 RoundtableCompassionScout Heroism AwardsThe form for recommending someone for the Medal of Merit, Honor Medal, or Heroism Award, is an 8 page form, BSA Form No 92-104, entitled "Recommendation for Lifesaving or Meritorious Action Awards.”  It can be downloaded in PDF format from the following location: www.scouting.org/sitecore/content/home/awards_central/lifesavingmeritousaction.aspxFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionScout Heroism Awards
  • Recommendation form requests contact for person that performed activity, contact information for who was aided, and contact for a person that witnessed the event.
  • As a general rule, any event that does not have the person aided’s contact information so that the committee can make inquiries as to the event will not be positively processed.
  • Witness information makes for a much stronger application.
  • February 2014 RoundtableCompassionCUB SCOUTs LovePack PizzazzFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionWhy Pizzazz?
  • Your Pack/Den is full of people with different interests
  • Attention spans are short (both Cub Scouts and their Parents)
  • Boys already have school and other “stay quiet and just watch/study” activities
  • Parents need to have fun too
  • Enthusiasm is Contagious!!February 2014 RoundtableCompassionWhat is Pizzazz?
  • Fun
  • Energy for all
  • Memorable
  • Attention getter
  • Useful for Memory Cues
  • Different
  • Shows planning and caring
  • Pizzazz may not always be “Bigger than Life” but it ALWAYS shows that you care enough to give it YOUR ALL.February 2014 RoundtableCompassionHow can you put Pizzazz into your program?
  • Visual Aids
  • Skits / Run-ons
  • Props
  • Costumes
  • Songs / Cheers
  • Presentations
  • Ceremonies
  • Flags
  • Take-aways
  • So much more…..
  • Will hit each of these points over the next few RoundtablesFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionPizzazz ComponentsCostumes
  • Nothing like a hat to change it up
  • Adds a fun factor – especially if the outfit is silly
  • Reminds the adults to be “big kids” and have fun too
  • Makes Cub Scouts VERY different than school
  • With just a change of hats you can go from Cub Scout Leader to a Big Game Hunter on the Africa Plains – stoke the boys’ imaginationFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionPizzazz ComponentsCostumes
  • Dress up for Important events
  • Costumes can be:
  • Hats
  • Wigs
  • Jackets
  • Masks (tasteful)
  • Legends, history, vocational
  • Best place to find pieces for your costume trunk – Thrift stores
  • Make as many pieces as you can and keep them available for future presentations
  • What’s the Limit?Keep it in good taste and do not offend February 2014 RoundtableCompassionHow can you put Pizzazz into your program?
  • Visual Aids
  • Skits / Run-ons
  • Props
  • Costumes
  • Songs / Cheers
  • Presentations
  • Ceremonies
  • Flags
  • Take-aways
  • So much more…..
  • Will hit each of these points over the next few RoundtablesFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionZekiah District Pinewood DerbyMarch 8thOpen to ALL ScoutsCapitol Clubhouse$5Cubmaster and Pack Leaders
  • Big Event Management
  • Blue and Gold
  • Award Presentation
  • Succession Training
  • Where can we hold this? Sites and facilities
  • Den Leaders
  • After Rank – What Now?
  • Using parents to enrich your program
  • Webelos Leaders
  • Troop Visits
  • Cross-over
  • Arrow of Light
  • NCAC Tour and Activity PlanFrequently Asked Questions:Q. Who approves or disapproves the “Tour and Activity Plan”?A. The new “Tour and Activity Plan” does not require an approval or disapproval.  There is certain information that is required and if the information is not there or is incorrect you are unable to proceed with filling out of the “Tour and Activity Plan”. Q. Why change the tour permit?A. This update replaces the former “online” tour permit with an interactive planning tool that allows you greater flexibility. It is the first phase to the online version—with more enhancements to come.. Q. Why should I complete a tour and activity plan?A. The tour and activity plan is a planning tool for best practices to be prepared for safe and fun adventure. Completing the plan may not address all possible challenges, but it can help ensure that appropriate planning has been conducted, that qualified and trained leadership is in place, and that the right equipment is available for the adventure.In addition, the plan helps to organize safe and appropriate transportation to and from an event, and defines driver qualifications and minimum limits of insurance coverage for drivers and vehicles used to transport participants.Please complete and submit this plan at least 21 days in advance (check with your local council) to ensure your council has enough time to review the plan and assist as necessary.Q. When do I need to complete a tour and activity plan? A. Times when a tour and activity plan must be submitted for council review include the following:Trips of 500 miles or more; orTrips outside of council borders (exception: not to your council-owned property and District Camporee’s); (NCAC Boarder are: Virginia; Caroline County, Culpeper County, Fairfax County, Fauquier County, King George County, Loudoun County, Prince William County, Spotsylvania County and Stafford County.  Maryland; Calvert County, Charles County, Frederick County, Montgomery County, Prince George’s County and St Mary’s County.  Washington D.C.)Trips to any national high-adventure base, national Scout jamboree, National Order of the Arrow Conference, the Summit Bechtel Reserve, or a regionally sponsored event; orWhen conducting any of the following activities outside of council or district events:Aquatics activities (swimming, boating, floating, scuba, etc.)Climbing and rappellingOrientation flights (process flying plan)Shooting sportsAny activities involving motorized vehicles as part of the program (snowmobiles, boating, etc.); or.”At a council's request (Contact your local council for additional guidelines or regulations concerning tour and activity plans; many have set guidelines for events or activities within council boundaries such as for Cub Scout overnight camping.)Regardless, the tour and activity plan is an excellent tool that should be included in preparation for all activities, even those not requiring it. It guides a tour leader through itineraries, travel arrangements, two-deep leadership, supervision qualifications, and transportation.Q. Where can I find the tour and activity plan online? A. You will need to log in to www.MyScouting.org and select the tour and activity plan under your “Unit ToolFebruary 2014 RoundtableCompassionToday marks the 104rd anniversary of Scouting in the United States! You probably already know about Lord Baden-Powell and the story about the Unknown Scout who led William D. Boyce through London, but do you know about some of Scouting's other founders?Daniel Carter Beard was an illustrator, author, youth leader, and social reformer. He started an outdoor education program called the Sons of Daniel Boone which served as one of the templates for and later merged with BSA. Beard became BSA's first National Commissioner and was the only recipient of the Gold Eagle Badge, the precursor to the Distinguished Ea
    We Need Your Support
    Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

    Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

    No, Thanks